Electric Toilets Analysts Has the Best Ideas To Keep Warm During Those Winter Months

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Your Electric Toilets Professionals Say Winter Doesn’t Have to Be So Bad

Raritan Engineering Company your electric toilets specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the best ideas to keep warm during the winter months.

Your electic toilets analysts know that Key West Race Week is one of the biggest regattas of the winter season, and for many, a great chance for a tune up.

There are a number of great events this winter in Florida, including Quantum Key West Race Week and the Quantum J/70 series that you won’t want to miss. 

Key West

Close to the trade winds – January’s best…is in Key West.

Your electric flush toilet experts understand that there are normally 1 to 2 cold fronts per week in Key West during January – meaning a very shifty and strong Northerly with flatter water for a few days. 

The weather gets hot when the high-pressure system is over Florida and the wind will shift from east to southeast. Your electric toilets for sale specialists know that after the high leaves the Keys, it stays warm and the breeze gets a bit lighter and shiftier from the southeast with some chop and swell. Watch the right and sail for pressure.


Your Electric Toilets Experts Show You the Best Options to Enjoy the Heat

You can find more information as well as get assistance on boat toilets and on the best ideas to keep warm during those winter months at Raritan Engineering.

You boat toilets professionals know you should take advantage of Quantum coaching, debriefs and class gurus available to help at the race village and check out Coach Ed Adams weather report each morning.

Tampa Bay

A challenging and fun venue – expect to see flat water with shifty lake-like conditions. Despite it being known as the Sunshine State, be sure to pack warm clothing and foul weather gear. 

South Beach and Ft. Lauderdale

South Beach and Ft. Lauderdale have some of the best sailing in Florida, with windy and wavy conditions on the Atlantic. Your best marine electric toilet The Ft. Lauderdale to Key West Race is a popular feeder race for Key West Race Week that attracts a mixture of sailors from grand prix racers to cruisers. 

Miami

Miami’s Biscayne Bay attracts sailors from all over during the winter months due to its incredible sailing conditions, warm waters and competitive fleets. Several Olympic and professional sailors flock to Miami and call this place home for the winter months due to a wide variety of training conditions and opportunities to cross-train in other competitive fleets.

Many fleets are following in the Etchells and Melges 20′s footsteps with winter series. Competitors can find local storage and leave their boats in between regattas if they are going to compete in any of the winter series. 

Among all the winter series, midwinter championships, and several other regattas being held in Florida this winter it shouldn’t be hard to find regattas that are suited to your sailing. 

Raritan Engineering has more informaton on electric toilets, boat toilets, marine hot water heater, and on the best ideas to keep warm during the winter months. 

via Keeping it Hot during the Winter

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Group #24 Battery Box Experts Explain the Dangers of Running Inlets

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Your Group #24 Battery Box Specialists Suggest Leaving the Difficult Navigation to the Professionals

Stainless Marine your group #24 battery box professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the dangers of running inlets.

Your group #24 battery box experts know that it seems like a simple thing, this running of inlets. In reality, it may be the most dangerous bit of navigation boaters attempt.

I know that some of you disagree. After all, tens of thousands of boats transit coastal inlets on a weekly basis, mostly without incident. Boats today are well-built, and a select few, like the SeaVee in which Fernandez was cruising, are superbly crafted vessels that will take just about anything. 

Despite all this wonderment, three young men died while boating.

We don’t know the cause of this tragedy yet: the investigation by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is ongoing. But the deaths have given me pause and cause to write this one reminder about running inlets. 

Be careful. Wear lifejackets. Learn to time the waves. Your group #24 battery box analysts know you should stand off if need be. Get local knowledge from those who KNOW–hiring a well-regarded local captain to accompany you aboard your own boat if that is what it takes.

Almost every inlet along the coast has a bad reputation. Some worse than others.

I’ve been through most of them and can attest that these are all well-deserved.

Last September, one boating buddy after another e-mailed me an incredible sequence of images taken of a 50-foot convertible broaching in Jupiter Inlet, Florida. 


Your Group #24 Battery Box Analysts Know How Quickly the Sea Can Turn On You

You can find more information as well as get assistance on group #27 battery box and on the dangers of running inlets at Stainless Marine.

Your group #27 battery box analysts know that the images are troubling because they show how quickly and violently the sea can have its way with you when given the opportunity. Your group #24 battery box professionals understand that if the boat appears to fall off the face of a breaking wave and is swallowed in the trough. The following wave rolls her on her beam end and it appears that she is lost. 

Some forum fulminators blame the captain, suggesting that he put a buck ahead of safety. Others suggest that it was the fault of politicians for spending tax dollars on their lavish lifestyles instead of the inlet. 

This was a textbook case that I can relate to, since I learned to fear and respect the sea in Jupiter Inlet. My dad was crazy for fishing and moved to Jupiter in the early 1970s. He would charter with a salty fellow by the name of Captain Cal, who ran a Bertram 31.

My dad spent more time talking to Cal about fishing, and his first solo in the inlet was almost his last. He filled our SeaCraft 21 to the gunwales and turned the helm over to me. While I rescued the boat from the waves, I was summarily banned from wandering offshore. I of course ignored his instructions and, taking small steps, learned my way around the inlet. 

Yup, I know exactly why my pals have struggled with those horrible images. They realize as I do that it could have happened to any one of us.

So don’t forget these helpful tips for staying safe if you’re thinking about running inlets. 1) You need to wear life jackets;  2) learn to time the waves;  and 3) stand-off if need be.

Stainless Marine has more information on group #24 battery box, group #27 battery box, boat parts and accessories, and on the dangers of running inlets.

via Running Inlets Is Dangerous

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Marine Hot Water Heaters Specialists Successfully Keep Us Up to Date on New Rules

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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Analysts Discuss All That’s New

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week information on marine hot water heaters and on keeping up to date on new sailing rules.

Every four years, on New Year’s Day of the year following the Olympic regatta, revised racing rules published by World Sailing take effect. This is the first of a series of articles covering important changes for 2017. 


New Rule 21: EXONERATION

When a boat is sailing within the room or mark-room to which she is entitled, she shall be exonerated if, in an incident with a boat required to give her that room or mark-room, (a) she breaks a rule of Section A, rule 15 or rule 16, or (b) she is compelled to break rule 31.

Revised Rule 21 will apply whenever a boat is “sailing within the room or mark-room to which she is entitled.” In the 2013-2016 edition of the rulebook, Rule 21 applies only if the rule entitling a boat to room or mark-room is a rule of Section C. Two rules require a boat to give another boat mark-room: Rule 18.2 and Rule 18.3, both in Section C. 


Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Professionals Want You to Avoid Being Disqualified

Your marine hot water heaters experts know that to see why the revised Rule 21 is a fairer rule, consider the common situation shown in Diagram A, which shows Tom and Jerry sailing on a run, spinnakers set. Tom overtook Jerry from clear astern, so Jerry may sail above his proper course (see Rule 17). 

Under the old rules, Tom would be disqualified for breaking Rule 11, but under revised Rule 21, Tom would be exonerated because, while responding promptly in a seamanlike way to Jerry’s luff, Tom was “sailing within the room to which he was entitled.” 


19.1 When Rule 19 Applies

Rule 19 applies between two boats at an obstruction except…(b) when rule 18 applies between the boats and the obstruction is another boat overlapped with each of them.

Rule 19.1(b) is a new rule for 2017. Since 2009, there have been two separate and different rules for passing marks and obstructions: Rule 18 for marks and Rule 19 for obstructions. Those two rules worked well for about five years, but in 2014, competitors and judges began to notice and publicize a problem that occurred when both Rule 18 and Rule 19 applied at the same time. 

To understand the problem, we need to study how the rules apply to the incident shown in Diagram B. In light wind, three Lasers are overlapped on port tack, approaching a leeward mark to be left to port. 

We had been applying Rule 18.2(b)’s first sentence to the incident, and we had overlooked the fact that Rule 19.2 also applied at Position 2. Rule 18.2(b) requires Otto to give both Mitch and Ina mark-room. 

So you can understand the need for the new Rule 19.1(b), assume that at Position 2, it becomes clear to Mitch and Ina that if Otto continues on his current course, he will not give Mitch and Ina enough space for both of them to round the mark without contact occurring between them or between Ina and the mark. 

Rule 19.2(b) is not required, nor was it ever intended, to apply in this situation. It only complicates the analysis. Because Rule 18 applies and Otto (the obstruction) is a boat overlapped with both Mitch and Ina, new Rule 19.1(b) will “switch off” Rule 19.2(b), leaving only Rule 18.2 to handle the rounding. 

The bottom line is this: If you, like almost everyone else, had not noticed the problem Rule 19.2(b) causes in the situation involving Otto, Mitch and Ina, know that new Rule 19.1(b) will allow you to continue rounding leeward marks just as you have been doing since 2009. Just keep doing what you have been doing, and all will be well.

Visit us at http://www.raritaneng.com/ for more information at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have more information on marine hot water heaters and on keeping up to date on new sailing rules.

via New Year, New Rules

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Ball Valves Experts Protect Your Health While Tropical Sailing

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Your Ball Valves Specialists Know the Threat of Disease Always Lingers When You’re Tropical Sailing 

Raritan Engineering Company your ball valves professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to protect your health while tropical sailing.

Your ball valves experts know that tropical sailing means diseases, and the past decade has seen a grip of new threats facing anyone who spends their life next to the water. As of last week, there’s a new one. According to theScience Daily, scientists at the University of Florida have identified a patient in Haiti with a serious mosquito-borne illness that has never before been reported in the Caribbean nation.

it’s called “Mayaro virus”, and has similar effects of Chikungaya, only worse. Your ball valve weight chart analysts know that with the world’s attention on stopping the Zika epidemic, “the finding of yet another mosquito-borne virus which may be starting to circulate in the Caribbean is of concern,” said Glenn Morris, director of the UF Emerging Pathogens Institute. 

When we started our voyage in 1984 little did we realize that our lifestyle was suddenly to be much more healthful than living a sedentary life in Europe or in the USA! In the last 2 years, we have become more and more involved in our own health and decided to take some easy steps to insure a long cruising life … in good health! 

Your marine sanitation specialists know that the diver looks at her and tells her that now that he is in his 80′ he doesn’t clean as many boats in a week either! Part of our health is related to the physical activities we have in our daily life.People working in a office from 8-to-5 have so little physical activities as they sit most of their day … in front of a desk, in the car, in front of TV.


Your Ball Valves Analysts Recommend Sun Exposure to Boost Your Immune System

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine sanitation and on how to protect your health while tropical sailing at Raritan Engineering.

We don’t spend 8-hour days under fluorescent lights or other artificial lights but spend plenty of time in nice sunshine that helps our body produce vitamin D … Your 2 full port ball valve professionals say that contrary to what we often hear about staying away from the sun, now sciences shows that to expose our body for a limited time each day to the sun, is actually very beneficial to our health! 

In cities, we get exposed to electric radiations (domestic power and power lines), microwaves from mobile phones and ovens,, and plenty more waves from remote controls, electronic sensors, micro-transmitters, TV, phone and more. Luckily for us cruisers, we get exposed to lot less of these waves in remote anchorages and at sea. DC is less toxic than AC too. 

Coconut water is so healthy! Your 3 way ball valve experts understand that we are always happy to trade in the islands for coconut water, coconut meat, young coconut sweet meat … Unless we only eat pre-packaged food (frozen foods, canned food, … ) adulterated with pesticides and chemicals or genetically modified to please consumers in 1st world nations, we will eat much healthier foods while cruising around the world.

Modern life stress is generally absent as we experience freedom and great pleasure in meeting diverse cultures and so many nice people both ashore and as fellow cruisers. But we have to make sure the sailing life style does not create it’s own stress. 

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to protect your health while tropical sailing. 1) Have a good exercise routine in action before going sailing;  2) sun exposure will boost your immune system;  and 3) don’t underestimate the benefit of drinking coconut water.

Raritan Engineering has more information on ball valves, marine sanitation, macerating pump, and on how to protect your health while tropical sailing.

via Hold the Mayaro

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Macerating Pump Analysts Share How to Avoid Pirates

Your Macerating Pump Professionals Stress the Need to Exercise Caution

Raritan Engineering Company wants to keep you informed this week about macerating pump and how to avoid pirates.

 

Boats sailing in convoy across the pirate-infested Gulf of Aden held a tight formation. A low-power handheld was the communication tool of choice.

We, the crews of all 27 yachts heading westward off the coast of Yemen, watched with dread as a large, rusty fishing boat slowly revealed itself in the morning mist. 

Our convoy was sailing in tight military formation and pressed on despite our nervousness. The tension was thick. We’d tracked the shabby vessel that lay ahead on our radars with much discussion and speculation. 

Just as we were close enough to smell its rotting fish, we heard a roar. A large, powerful skiff appeared around its transom and careened directly at us at high speed. For a moment, our formation held. 

“He’s right next to me!” screamed a woman on the VHF. “This must not be allowed to happen. I need support right now! Now, goddamn it!”

“Welcome to yachting, Gulf of Aden style,” I said in response.
Everyone who circumnavigates must either sail the Red Sea or around the southern tip of Africa.

It was strictly a Corinthian affair, so there was no cost to anyone. There were, of course, some ground rules. Participants had to be able to do five knots through the water and to be able to carry enough fuel for the full 650-mile run. Radar reflectors and masthead running lights were prohibited, and only dim, deck-level lights were allowed.

Since we knew pirates might be equipped with radars, radios, and other gadgets, we didn’t use our regular boat names; instead, we adopted military-sounding ones: I was “Eagle Three,” and my German friend. Horst, on the Island Packet 38 Pacific Star, was now called “Merlin Lead.” All told, we represented 17 countries, almost a floating United Nations.
Tom decided we’d convoy in groups of six, with two lines of vessels arranged three abreast. 

A convoy boat lost power three times during the passage. Tom would then call for us to “loiter,” and the entire fleet would stop, more or less in formation, for 10 minutes for the mechanical problem to be sorted out. 


Your Macerating Pump Experts Recommend Having a Good Mechanic On Board

Luckily, we had light weather the entire way. Your macerating pump specialists know that if we’d encountered a major storm, it was agreed that we’d go our separate ways and reconverge at our next waypoint, knowing that pirate activity would be low because of the weather: Somali pirates generally don’t attack in winds greater than 25 knots.

Pirate attacks against large commercial vessels are a daily occurrence in this area; some days, multiple attacks occur within 100 miles of Aden. Luckily, small sailboats aren’t the preferred targets of the Somalis. 

Only the Russian coalition forces bragged to me-they’d been drinking at the Oasis Club in Salalah-that they’d slid up alongside a nonplussed pirate boat, lifted it up via their deck crane while still full of pirates, and carried them both, boat and crew, back to cold, cold Siberia.

Each of our convoy members kept a sharp lookout, visually and on radar, for approaching vessels. If any were sighted, the entire group was immediately given a heads up with bearing and distance. 

Each group would then huddle, with the wing vessels moving in closer to the group leader and the second line squeezing up forward between them.

In my opinion the most important ingredient for a successful convoy is the character of its leader. We were lucky to have Tom Sampson’s steady hand at our helm. 

There were, of course, a number of times when tensions flared, which is understandable when transiting pirate-prone waters. But for every act of individual selfishness, there was a collective act of selflessness. 

The result was 27 vessels arriving in Aden safely and free of any pirate engagement. We were all extremely grateful for our safe passage. It could’ve easily gone the other way, as it had for the traumatized crew of Rockall, who were captured and held for 52 days. 

So, a few days after our safe arrival, many of us gathered on the foredeck of our boat, Wild Card, which was anchored in almost the exact location where the attack on the USS Cole took place. We were there to honor the 17 young Americans killed in October 2000. We poured our prayers, our flowers, and our love into the harbor waters, as well as a tot of rum for each lost sailor.

“Peace,” we muttered sadly from the deck of an American yacht in the waters off the war-torn Arabian Peninsula.

Learn more from Raritan Engineering and see how we always know more about macerating pump and on how to avoid pirates.

via Tiptoe Through the Pirates

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Stainless Steel Tubing Professionals Uncover Seamanship Lessons That Never Get Old

Your Stainless Steel Tubing Experts Introduce You to The Lost Art of Seamanship
Stainless Marine your stainless steel tubinganalysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding uncovering seamanship lessons that never get old.

Your stainless steel tubing professionals know that in his Seamanship column for Boating’s July 1960 issue, Elbert Robberson wrote: “In daylight, objects around you are easy to identify. They are big or little, short or long, round or square, and they appear very plainly to be bridges, docks, land, beacons, buoys, or boats of various kinds heading one way or another. But at night, all of these familiar shapes disappear, and all that is left are pinpoints of light:

A lot about boating has changed in the decades since Robberson penned these words, but the need for understanding navigation lights is a seamanship skill that still applies today.

Have a Plan B

In his Seamanship column for our January 1958 issue, Robberson addressed how to prepare an inexperienced crew to help in emergencies.

Your Stainless Steel Tubing Specialists Successfully Train Even the Most Inexperienced
You can find more information as well as get assistance on group #24 battery box and on uncovering seamanship lessons that never get old at Stainless Marine.

“First of all,” he wrote, “unless you know firsthand that your passengers are skilled at boating, assume they know nothing of what goes on inside the gunwales.”

Anchors Away

Your group #24 battery box experts know that in her January 1977 column, Elleen Holm Matthew wrote about anchoring in all sorts of conditions. While windlasses have made some of her points moot, her thoughts on scope still hold true.

Do No Harm

Bob Armstrong wrote about seamanship for the magazine in the 1980s, and in our March 1983 issue, he addressed the confusion some boaters have regarding right of way. Your small stainless steel tubing specialists understand that first and foremost, it’s a boater’s job to prevent collision. On this, he opined: “And that’s why one of the underlying principles is the more maneuverable vessel stays out of the way of the less ­maneuverable.”

Backing In

Former staff pundit Stuart Reininger laid it on the line in our November 1998 issue when he declared about docking in a slip: “Your stainless steel tubing sizes analysts know that sailboats bow in. Powerboats back in. We have a tradition to uphold.” (We still like to uphold it.) When the wind and current are stacked against you, Reininger recommended the spring-line method.

Quick Tip: Your stainless steel tubing for sale professionals say that when it comes to docking, there’s a timeless saying to help you work your way in. “Go slow like a pro, fast like an ass.” In other words, slow and steady wins the docking race.

So don’t forget these amazing lessons in successful seamanship. 1) When you have an inexperienced crew, always have a ‘plan B’; 2) become experienced in anchoring in all types of conditions; and 3) when it comes to docking, don’t rush it.

Stainless Marine has more information on stainless steel tubing, group #24 battery box, group #27 battery box, and on uncovering timeless seamanship lessons that never get old.

via Five Timeless Seamanship Lessons

Boat Parts and Accessories Specialists Help You to Keep Your Boat Safe From Theft

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Your Boat Parts and Accessories Experts Suggest That All Boat Owners Take Precautions to Avoid Theft
Stainless Marine your boat parts and accessories analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to keep your boat safe from theft.

Your boat parts and accessories professionals know that if you’re a boat owner, you need to take precautions to keep your boat safe. According to a study of the BoatUS Marine Insurance Claims Files, 10 out of every 1,000 personal watercrafts are stolen and 2 out of every 1,000 runabouts are stolen.

To keep your boat safe, the first thing to remember is that a thief will look for an easy opportunity. Help prevent theft by remembering time, noise, and visibility. The more you can do to increase the time it takes to steal your boat, the better off you’ll be.

Get an alarm system.

Securing your boat with an alarm system is the number one thing you can do to prevent theft. It isn’t always easy to find the right security provider.

Go to http://www.stainlessmarine.com/about-us/ and see how you can always find more information as well as get assistance on boat parts and accessories and on how to keep your boat safe from theft at Stainless Marine.

Reliability: Is the system designed to last? Is it designed to work in a water environment? Make sure you ask about the alarm sensibility too – will it be triggered by a bird landing on the deck?

Coverage: Ask if the security system protects decks, hatches, and the gunwale. Find out if the alarm is triggered when an intruder first climbs on board or if the alarm waits to alert when someone reaches the cabin.

Motion sensor lights: Well-lit boats and storage areas will help deter a thief. One way to ensure there is good lighting is with motion sensor lights. ADT, SimpliSafe, andFrontPoint all offer motion sensors as part of their security packages, as do Protect America and LifeShield, at their highest package levels.

Make sure the boat cannot move easily when it’s parked.

The harder it is to move the boat, the more difficult it is to steal. Approximately ninety percent of stolen boats are taken while on the trailer. If you must leave your boat on a trailer, you can chain the trailer frame to a tree or other sturdy object to keep the trailer from being moved easily, or put a boot on one of the tires. .

Choose a marina wisely.

If you are storing your boat in a marina, be sure to choose one with good lighting and full-time security. The marina employees should be aware of your boat and when you are using it.

Your boat is meant to be used and enjoyed. Practice some safety tips to keep your boat safe from theft so you can enjoy hours on the open water.

So keep these pointers in mind in order to keep your boat safe from theft. 1) Get an alarm system; 2) make sure the boat cannot move easily when parked; and 3) choose a marine wisely.

Click here and see how Stainless Marine always has more information on boat parts and accessories and on how to keep your boat safe from theft.

via How to Keep Your Boat Safe From Theft

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High Performance Marine Parts Analysts Suggest Avoiding These Things When Facing Bad Weather

Your High Performance Marine Parts Experts Help You to Successfully Endure Nature’s “Preparedness Tests”
Stainless Marine your high performance marine parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding things to avoid when facing bad weather.

Your high performance marine parts analysts know that there’s plenty of thundering, blowing, raining and hailing going on all over the country–though some areas sure could use MORE rain. I don’t know about you, but I look at such instances as if they are giving us a much needed “trial run” to test out our level of preparedness amidst a “surprise” situation that Mother Nature likes to throw at us.

And your high performance marine engine parts specialists know there are plenty of “trial runs” available. As we’ve already seen played out in the national news, the storm and tornado season is in full swing–not to mention the lightening strikes that are causing so many fires. Each year, the U.S. gets an average of 5.9 hurricanes, 1,000 tornadoes and 10,000 severe thunderstorms!

You and your performance marine professionals know who I’m talking about. Perhaps it’s one of those crazy people who get within 100 feet of a huge tornado just so that they can post the footage to YouTube.

I actually remember that happening after Hurricane Sandy–all of the city folks going crazy and buying all of the things that they should have had on hand in the first place, taking it all back the next day for a refund! That’s just nutzo!!

Your High Performance Marine Parts Specialists Know It Is Important Not to Freak Out With Hurricane Warnings
You can find more information as well as get assistance on performance marine parts and on things that you need to avoid when facing bad weather at Stainless Marine.

Your performance marine parts experts know that of course there’s the situation in which a hurricane is predicted in an area that we all know is prone to hurricanes–and yet when the forecast comes, everyone is freaking out, going to the hardware store and buying up nails and plywood and such. Your high performance boats analysts and I still don’t understand that one.

And then, of course, you’ve got the people who JUST buy the beer and the cigarettes and decide that they’re just going to party their way through the disaster.

How about the folks who play in flood waters that are moving fast? How about the woman who says she’s going to stay put because she doesn’t want to miss the latest episode of “Honey Boo Boo”? (True story!)

(Let’s face it. There aren’t a lot of audiences who will actually GET the “dumb squared” part of your scenario. So now’s your chance to unload! :-) And I’m even going to let you “unload” as many as three times.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers when considering what things to avoid when facing bad weather. 1) You do not need to get within 100 feet of a huge hurricane just so that they can post the footage to YouTube; 2) you don’t need to buy the beer and the cigarettes and decide that they’re just going to party their way through the disaster; and 3) don’t freak out.

Stainless Marine has more information on high performance marine parts, performance marine parts, outboard engine brackets, and on things to avoid doing when facing bad weather.

via Dumb Things People Do Amidst a Severe Storm Warning

http://www.hitmission.com/hydravid/marine-engine-parts-stainless-marine-video_268fc2cb5.html

TruDesign Experts Share #1 Tips for Getting Fit for Sailing



Your TruDesign Analysts Help You to Face the Most Physically Demanding Situations While Sailing 

Raritan Engineering Company your TruDesign specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding #1 tips for getting fit for sailing. 

Your TruDesign experts know that on October 11, seven teams will depart from Alicante, Spain on 65-foot carbon fiber yachts, the start of the most grueling sailing race on the planet – 38,739 nautical miles around the world.  

In its 41-year history, the race has claimed the lives of five sailors, and injured dozens. The 2014-15 edition promises to be the most physically demanding yet.  

Teams have responded by implementing rigorous strength training programs prior to their arrival in Spain. We sat down with three of them to find out their training philosophy.

The Team: Brunel (Holland)

The Strategy: Hit the Gym, Get Big

Team Brunel came together in spring 2014 and immediately made dry-land training and gym workouts a priority. “We have been in the gym every morning for the past five months,” says skipper Bouwe Bekking. 


Your TruDesign Professionals Understand How Important It Is to Make Workouts a Priority

Go to http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/trudesign-products/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on TruDesign and on #1 tips for getting fit for sailing.

The Team:  SCA

The Strategy: Interval Training

Your TruDesign analysts know that as the only all-female entry in the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 (and the first all-women’s entry since 2001-02), Team SCA is determined not to let the physicality of the race work to their disadvantage. To help even the playing field, they are permitted to use an 11-women crew, compared to all the other eight-man crews. Even so, they started their dry-land training in summer 2013, the earliest of any team. 

The Team: Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing

The Strategy: Avoid Injury

The Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing team started their formal workouts six moths ago, using a mix of sailing and dry-land training in the coastal town of Cascais, Portugal just west of Lisbon. According to the team’s sports science manager Pete Cunningham, the focus of their workouts was not only strength and fitness, but also injury prevention. 

Cardio sessions lasted 90 minutes, up to four per week, including running, rowing, and a Sunday team bike ride. In the four weeks immediately before the race, the team has been tapering. “The crew reached a fitness level we were happy with, and now we are concentrating on maintaining this level,” says Harmer.

So don’t forget these amazing tips for remaining physically fit for all sailing situations that could come up. 1) The first strategy to use is interval training;  2) the second strategy to use is to avoid injury;  and 3) and the third strategy is to hit the gym and get big.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information on TruDesign and the #1 workout tips for getting in the best shape possible to be successful in any and all sailing situations.

via Workout Philosophy From the World’s Toughest Sailors

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Stainless Steel Tubing Professionals Uncover Seamanship Lessons That Never Get Old

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Your Stainless Steel Tubing Experts Introduce You to The Lost Art of Seamanship

Stainless Marine your stainless steel tubing analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding uncovering seamanship lessons that never get old.

Your stainless steel tubing professionals know that in his Seamanship column for Boating‘s July 1960 issue, Elbert Robberson wrote: “In daylight, objects around you are easy to identify. They are big or little, short or long, round or square, and they appear very plainly to be bridges, docks, land, beacons, buoys, or boats of various kinds heading one way or another. But at night, all of these familiar shapes disappear, and all that is left are pinpoints of light:

A lot about boating has changed in the decades since Robberson penned these words, but the need for understanding navigation lights is a seamanship skill that still applies today. 

Have a Plan B

In his Seamanship column for our January 1958 issue, Robberson addressed how to prepare an inexperienced crew to help in emergencies.


Your Stainless Steel Tubing Specialists Successfully Train Even the Most Inexperienced

You can find more information as well as get assistance on group #24 battery box and on uncovering seamanship lessons that never get old at Stainless Marine.

“First of all,” he wrote, “unless you know firsthand that your passengers are skilled at boating, assume they know nothing of what goes on inside the gunwales.” 

Anchors Away

Your group #24 battery box experts know that in her January 1977 column, Elleen Holm Matthew wrote about anchoring in all sorts of conditions. While windlasses have made some of her points moot, her thoughts on scope still hold true. 

Do No Harm

Bob Armstrong wrote about seamanship for the magazine in the 1980s, and in our March 1983 issue, he addressed the confusion some boaters have regarding right of way. Your small stainless steel tubing specialists understand that first and foremost, it’s a boater’s job to prevent collision. On this, he opined: “And that’s why one of the underlying principles is the more maneuverable vessel stays out of the way of the less ­maneuverable.”

Backing In

Former staff pundit Stuart Reininger laid it on the line in our November 1998 issue when he declared about docking in a slip: “Your stainless steel tubing sizes analysts know that sailboats bow in. Powerboats back in. We have a tradition to uphold.” (We still like to uphold it.) When the wind and current are stacked against you, Reininger recommended the spring-line method. 

Quick Tip: Your stainless steel tubing for sale professionals say that when it comes to docking, there’s a timeless saying to help you work your way in. “Go slow like a pro, fast like an ass.” In other words, slow and steady wins the docking race.

So don’t forget these amazing lessons in successful seamanship. 1) When you have an inexperienced crew, always have a ‘plan B’;  2) become experienced in anchoring in all types of conditions;  and 3) when it comes to docking, don’t rush it.

Stainless Marine has more information on stainless steel tubing, group #24 battery box, group #27 battery box, and on uncovering timeless seamanship lessons that never get old.

via Five Timeless Seamanship Lessons

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